Mobile devices

Mobile Device Management (MDM) enables IT admins to securely monitor and manage the mobile devices that access sensitive business data. It includes storing essential information about mobile devices, deciding which apps can be present on the devices, locating devices, and securing devices if lost or stolen. With the increased adoption of mobile devices, mobile device management (MDM) solutions have now evolved into Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) solutions.

The importance of MDM solutions and software

Mobile Device Management (MDM)

The core purpose of MDM is to protect the corporate network by securing and optimizing mobile devices, including laptops, smartphones, tablets, and Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices, that connect to enterprise networks. Besides boosting the security of business networks, it also enables employees to use their own devices, rather than corporate-supplied devices, to work more efficiently and be more productive.

MDM software is part of the wider enterprise mobility management (EMM) family, which incorporates enterprise file syncing and sharing, identity and access management (IAM), and mobile application management (MAM). MDM, in the context of controlling PCs, is referred to as unified endpoint management (UEM), which enables organizations to manage all of their enterprise devices from one single location.

How Mobile Device Management Works

To further understand what is mobile device management, you have to know how it works. MDM relies on two separate components. The first is an MDM server management console, which is stored in an organization’s data center and enables administrators to configure, manage, and enforce policies. The second is an MDM agent that receives and implements these policies on users’ devices.

Policies are configured by IT administrators through the MDM server management console, then the server pushes the policies to the MDM agent. The agent applies the specified policies onto a device by using application programming interfaces (APIs) that are built into the device’s operating system.

Early MDM solutions relied on subscriber identification module (SIM) cards and client-initiated steps, which restricted scalability. But modern versions can automatically detect when new devices connect to corporate networks and apply commands or policies for them to implement.

How Mobile Device Management Works

To further understand what is mobile device management, you have to know how it works. MDM relies on two separate components. The first is an MDM server management console, which is stored in an organization’s data center and enables administrators to configure, manage, and enforce policies. The second is an MDM agent that receives and implements these policies on users’ devices.

Policies are configured by IT administrators through the MDM server management console, then the server pushes the policies to the MDM agent. The agent applies the specified policies onto a device by using application programming interfaces (APIs) that are built into the device’s operating system.

Early MDM solutions relied on subscriber identification module (SIM) cards and client-initiated steps, which restricted scalability. But modern versions can automatically detect when new devices connect to corporate networks and apply commands or policies for them to implement.

BYOD and MDM

MDM first emerged in the early 2000s to allow organizations to take control and secure the first wave of smartphones and devices—like personal digital assistants—that were being used in the workplace. The consumerization of IT that has snowballed since then, starting with the launch of Apple’s first iPhone in 2007, fueled the trend of bring your own device (BYOD), which placed more importance on effective MDM tools.

The risks associated with the BYOD trend led to organizations implementing MDM software that helped their IT teams monitor, manage, and secure all devices brought into the workplace. These MDM tools remain crucial to securing the workplace in the face of increasingly sophisticated and costly cyberattacks and data breaches.

As employees increasingly expect to be able to use their personal devices at work, organizations need to be able to secure those devices and keep their users safe. Some employees who want to use their personal devices at work will do so even if their organization does not have a BYOD policy, a practice also known as shadow IT. It is therefore vital for businesses to implement a strong BYOD policy that enables employees to use their own devices without creating potential gaps in security.

However, implementing MDM within a BYOD environment can be challenging. Organizations must balance the need to secure their applications and data with maintaining employees’ privacy, such as IT being able to see the applications that users download or tracking their location.

Advantages of using an MDM solution

With most healthcare organizations moving towards electronic health records (EHRs), mobile device use is more popular than ever in the healthcare sector. But ensuring the personal health information (PHI) stored on mobile devices is secure and complying with regulatory standards like HIPAA can be a challenge. An MDM solution can help you meet compliance standards while also ensuring that PHI remains secure from unauthorized access.

Now that many enterprises are embracing mobility, one market that can benefit greatly from the advantages of MDM is the transportation industry. An MDM solution lets businesses track shipments and vehicle locations as well as maintain a history of locations traversed. It also lets you lock down corporate devices to specific apps and/or settings to prevent device misuse and ensure maximum productivity.

The transition to the digital age has affected no industry more than the education sector. With more and more schools adopting tablet-based teaching methods, it’s essential to manage these devices to ensure they’re only used for learning. Granular restrictions let you disable basic device functionalities such as the camera, as well as restrict access to certain websites.

Thanks to features like digital signage, mPOS, and self-service checkouts, mobile devices have found their niche in the retail sector. Some enterprises in the retail industry use mobile devices built for a specific need, while others use a combination of in-house apps and certain policies on more standard devices like phones and tablets. Both specialized devices such as rugged devices and standard mobile devices such as smartphones can be managed using an MDM solution.

With most organizations in the service industry leaning towards a mobile-only or mobile-first workforce, mobile devices—especially employee-owned devices—are being used more than ever. An MDM solution helps you seamlessly manage personal devices (BYOD management) and in-house apps while also ensuring those devices adhere to your enterprise’s security standards.

The MDM solution that can help

ManageEngine’s Mobile Device Manager Plus is the perfect enterprise mobile device management tool for SMBs and large enterprises. Let’s look at some of the features Mobile Device Manager Plus has to offer to simplify MDM device management:

Mobile Device Manager Plus supports multiple methods for enrollment, irrespective of whether the device is with the user or still sitting in one of your business’ storerooms. With Mobile Device Manager Plus, you can quickly and easily onboard devices in bulk with no user action required. Learn more about Mobile Device Manager Plus’ enrollment methods. It also helps with BYOD mobile device management i.e. mobile device management for personal devices, whereby you get to manage the workspace while having zero control over the personal space ensuring corporate data security without compromising on user privacy.

Silently install both purchased and in-house apps, and predefine app permissions and settings OTA to ensure they’re ready for use immediately after installation. In addition to silent installation, you can also delete or update apps remotely without requiring any user intervention. Further, Mobile Device Manager Plus also helps you maintain licenses of paid apps. Learn more about app management.

Ensure devices are ready for use the moment they’re handed over to employees by remotely preconfiguring basic settings for Wi-Fi, email, etc. Any configuration updates can also be made OTA. With Mobile Device Manager Plus, you can easily manage your BYOD environment by controlling all corporate aspects of a device while leaving personal data alone for a good balance between security and privacy. Learn more about policy management.

Mobile Device Manager Plus provides you with a host of options for mobile security—both proactive and reactive. In addition to granular restrictions, you can ensure only devices managed by Mobile Device Manager Plus can access corporate Exchange servers. By sandboxing your corporate documents, you can ensure that mobile devices attempting to access corporate data can only do so using the MDM agent app (ManageEngine MDM) present on the device, thereby preventing unauthorized access.

In addition to simple device deployment, Mobile Device Manager Plus provides multiple settings for maintaining deployed devices, including periodic device scanning to update your device inventory; remote troubleshooting; and scheduling/automating OS updates to ensure the most secure OS version is running on each device.

Resources:

https://www.fortinet.com/resources/cyberglossary/mobile-device-management
https://www.fortinet.com/resources/cyberglossary/mobile-device-management
https://www.manageengine.com/mobile-device-management/what-is-mdm.html
Mobile devices

With a mobile application, most of the code is downloaded and stored on the device itself (think iOS and Android). These are two primary components of appsec. The security aspect of appsec then comes into play when we consider protecting and safeguarding the app — and all data it encompasses.

Situation

In a bring your own device (BYOD) work environment, users expect to be able to work from any location at any time, on the device of their choice. Moreover, users now typically have several identities, meaning that they use their devices in both work-related and non-work-related contexts. For example, they might bring a personal tablet to a business meeting and expect to access files on a team’s Microsoft SharePoint site, or they might present a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation over Microsoft Skype for Business. They’re likely to check both work and personal email accounts on their phone, and may use their phone camera to take photos of whiteboard sessions to help them remember what a work group collaborated on during a meeting. On both types of device, they’re likely to have a mix of apps, some for personal use and some for work.

But as the traditional boundaries between work and personal life blur the use of these devices, it’s critical that devices be managed in a way that is acceptable to the entire business. Data policies, such as encryption, password length, password complexity, and password duration, must provide corporate data security on all devices while maintaining the privacy of workers’ personal information.

IT must be able to identify, with certainty, who a user is and if a device should have access to corporate resources. Current trends suggest that workers change jobs and companies several times over the course of a career, so IT needs a way to account for this flux of people and devices. What should IT do if a device is lost or an employee leaves the company? What is the best way to ensure that corporate resources are wiped from a personal device that should no longer have access to them?

Why is Mobile Device Security Important? 📊

  • ☑️ Kaspersky reports that it discovered almost 3.5 million malware on 1 million devices
  • ☑️ An attack is launched every 39 seconds
  • ☑️ Average number of attacks of 2,244 times each single day
  • ☑️ More than 50% of devices used in the workplace are mobile
  • ☑️ Vulnerabilities in mobile devices have increased by 42%
  • ☑️ Malware attacks are likely to increase by 50% compared to the previous year
  • ☑️ In 2018 alone, 75,000 mobile apps had vulnerabilities that Android had to fix
  • ☑️ SDK integrated in apps was discovered to have stolen 111 million contact information
  • ☑️ Hidden mobile apps represent up to 50% of transmission to remote endpoints
  • ☑️ About 3 to 4 employees per 100 using their device to access inappropriate content.
  • ☑️ Up to 80% of corporate owned mobile devices transmit data on WiFi networks
  • ☑️ 66% and 55% of enterprises and SMBs respectively provide company owned devices
  • ☑️ Approximately 4.3% of company-issued mobile devices are stolen or lost each year.
  • ☑️ It is estimated that large enterprises have more than 2,000 unsafe apps installed
  • ☑️ 86% – percentage of employees that access company emails through their phones
  • ☑️ 70 million smartphones are lost each year
  • ☑️ 60% of mobile device vulnerability derives from the client side
  • ☑️ 89% of vulnerabilities can be exploited without physical access to the mobile device
  • ☑️ 56% of vulnerabilities can be accessed without any sort of administrator access

This almost comes off as a redundant question. With as much as half of an organization’s computing devices now consisting of portable devices, mobile devices present peculiar challenges with regard to network security.

Now, businesses need to account for the different locations and uses of these devices as well. Especially since mobile usage in organizations has now surpassed those of desktop PCs, malicious hackers are now focusing their attention more and more on mobile devices.

Both IT departments and executive suite-level players like CIOs are fixated, for good reason, on thwarting potential threats to companies’ devices such as phishing scams, spyware, unsecured WIFI networks, data leakage. These days, most of the preoccupation centers around malicious mobile apps, or the theft or misplacement of employee mobile devices which might contain proprietary company secrets.

According to Dr. Rebecca Wynn, who heads information security for Matrix Medical Network, most enterprise security teams have gotten a fair handle on things with regard to enterprise mobility and mitigating external exposure that comes with attacks such as man-in-the-middle and malware.

However, Wynn says that data is harder to manage and protect on mobile devices because “the use of private, public apps, and company-branded apps which can leak employee and customer data in ways enterprise security doesn’t have visibility.”

A way to counteract this incident is for organizations to formulate internal policies, and sufficiently educate their employees on the potential dangers that their mobile devices pose to the organization’s interest.

The Mobile Device as a Security Threat 📉

Millennials might find it difficult to imagine, but mobile devices didn’t use to be as ubiquitous as they are today, and were nearly unheard of as a business threat. Before broadband and wireless technology exploded onto the scene, employees with stand-alone desktop computers were limited to Ethernet cables as their primary gateway access to either LAN or WAN corporate networks.

Consumer devices like the iPhone changed this calculus and ushered in the age of the mobile technology, and by extension, the mobile worker to the extent that virtually all employees now regard using a mobile device at their office as a given.

Consumers are now performing more and more daily actions from their smartphone. Everything from email to trading stocks through a top stock trading apps can be facilitated with mobile devices. With an increased mobile device capability, comes an increased vulnerability.

With this trend, IT departments were compelled to grapple with viruses that infected smartphones, like Cabir, the first virus that infected a mobile device in 2004. Hence, a new host of vulnerabilities followed the iPhone and smartphones onto the scene.

Compounding things, the current era is now plagued with threats and vulnerabilities related to Internet-of-Things (IoT). This development has challenged and burdened organizations along with their IT departments with a host of new endpoints that need to be secured.

Some organizations are approaching this issue by taking out these IoT devices from the central network and putting them in their own secluded virtual LAN with separating firewalls. The objective of these measures is to reduce the security incidents emanating from IoT devices.

Furthermore, they might disable certain functions that are infrequently used in IoT devices, say faxing on a wireless printer, to reduce opportunities for attacks. However, this action might not work for mobile devices since they need full network access to operate.

To counteract emerging mobile threats, software solutions have been designed for the enterprise space to confront and address these types of attacks. Most noteworthy among them is the Mobile Application Management (MAM). Others are the Mobile Device Management (MDM), Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM), and Unified Endpoint Management (UEM).

What is the Impact of Mobile Device on Student Learning?

impact of mobile device

You might think that a mobile device only refers to the use of mobile or cellular phones within the classroom environment, usually to the distraction of students. However, in this blog, we will be talking about the use of mobile devices such as tablets, laptops, Chromebooks, mobile or cellular phones etc. to enable learning.

The impact of the mobile device on learning is far-reaching and comprehensive. To begin with, at the outset, it is the naturalization of advanced technology within the classroom context for students. This means that students who might already be embracing technology will get used to using it for learning and development purposes, instead of just games. Enhanced learning materials such as the use of dynamic visual mediums like pictures and videos and gifs are made possible through the impact of the mobile device in the classroom.

The effect of using the mobile device in student learning also has consequences beyond the school – students are using tools they will be using in their employment, thus making the future ready during their schooling itself.

mobile learning

But what counts as learning on a mobile device? Any time a mobile device such as a tablet, mobile or cellular phone, laptop or Chromebook is used to aid in teaching or learning of the classroom curriculum, it can be counted as learning on a mobile device. This might involve everything from reading course materials on the mobile device to playing educational games on the mobile device, to even answering examinations on the mobile device.

The use of the mobile device in the classroom can easily be integrated into the most traditional and old fashioned classroom easily, with the investment of an initial start-up cost and some training for both teachers and students.

What is the impact of the mobile device on students and student learning?

The effect of the mobile device on student’s and student learning is quite broad. With the growth of education technology and its pervasiveness within the educational ecosystem, the impact of the mobile device on student learning is meaningful. Extensive research has thus been conducted about the impact of the mobile device on student learning. Some of the more far-reaching effects of the mobile device on student learning are discussed in greater detail below:

1. Improved understanding of students

Recent research has shown that an improved understanding of materials is another impact of the mobile device on student learning. One of the key issues teachers face is that different students learn at different paces and it might be difficult to gauge this individually for each student.

The impact of the mobil e device here cannot be undersold – since the impact of mobile device usage is limited to the use if individual devices by each student, learning can also happen at an individual pace. Improved understanding for students this is a big impact of the mobil e device in the classroom and in educational institutions. It addresses a key need of teachers across the educational ecosystem.

2. Equity in access to mobile learning

One of the key things educational experts and champions advocate for is the flattening of the playing field for students through the use of technologies. It is no different for the use of the mobile device in the classroom. The students who use hardware like mobile devices, like laptops, tablets, Chromebooks etc experience the positive impact of the mobile device on student learning across the board. This means that it is creating more equitable access to learning – means every student has the same access as their fellow student to the same materials.

The need for equality in learning cannot be overstated in today’s world. It is one of the biggest signifiers of social mobility, and if the impact of the mobile device on student learning is access to more learning and thus more opportunities later in life, the impact of the mobile device on building a better world cannot be ignored. Stakeholders in the educational ecosystem must thus work towards in ensuring the impact of the mobile device on student learning is experienced by students all across of the world.

3. Empowering more proactive learning

A more proactive approach to learning is another impact mobile device has on students in the classroom according to a new study conducted on students using mobile devices in the classroom. The study demonstrated that the impact of the mobile device in the classroom for the purpose of the student had a positive impact in how proactive students became about their learning. Students taking a greater interested in learning their course material.

Proactive learning is important to build an interest in learning and education itself for students and it is an effect of the mobile device that is easily achievable for most educational institutions. All they need to do is invest in the initial costs of acquiring mobile device – anything from tablets to laptops would suffice here – to some initial time investment in training students to use them well and experience the full positive impact of the mobile device on their learning.

4. Improved conversational skills

conversation

Another academic research study has shown that another effect of the mobile device in student learning is the improvement of their intra student conversational skills. In this study, on the group of students was given a mobile device to study the impact of the mobile device on improvement in English conversational skills. Another group was just used as a control with traditional face to face teaching methods. After a period of time, when both groups of students were tested on their conversational skills, the effect of the mobile device on English language conversational skills was found to be beneficial to the students, even more so than the control group. This demonstrates that the impact of the mobile device on student learning is positive as far as improving speaking and communication skills in English goes.

5. Greater academic achievements

The very same academic research study as above also demonstrated another effect of the mobile device on student learning. Researchers in this study found that the students who were using the mobile device through their learning had higher academic achievements compared to the control group who are learning in the classroom. This means that those students that were using mobile device had better scores and academic achievements.

Resources:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/insidetrack/mobile-device-management-at-microsoft
https://tokenist.com/mobile-device-security/
https://fedena.com/blog/2019/02/what-is-the-impact-of-mobile-device-on-student-learning.html
Mobile devices

Use delta user discovery and incremental updates. When delta discovery is enabled in AD User Discovery settings, and incremental updates are selected in the collection settings, updates are synchronized more often. This ensures that licensing new users and removing licenses for disabled users occur quickly.

Situation

In a bring your own device (BYOD) work environment, users expect to be able to work from any location at any time, on the device of their choice. Moreover, users now typically have several identities, meaning that they use their devices in both work-related and non-work-related contexts. For example, they might bring a personal tablet to a business meeting and expect to access files on a team’s Microsoft SharePoint site, or they might present a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation over Microsoft Skype for Business. They’re likely to check both work and personal email accounts on their phone, and may use their phone camera to take photos of whiteboard sessions to help them remember what a work group collaborated on during a meeting. On both types of device, they’re likely to have a mix of apps, some for personal use and some for work.

But as the traditional boundaries between work and personal life blur the use of these devices, it’s critical that devices be managed in a way that is acceptable to the entire business. Data policies, such as encryption, password length, password complexity, and password duration, must provide corporate data security on all devices while maintaining the privacy of workers’ personal information.

IT must be able to identify, with certainty, who a user is and if a device should have access to corporate resources. Current trends suggest that workers change jobs and companies several times over the course of a career, so IT needs a way to account for this flux of people and devices. What should IT do if a device is lost or an employee leaves the company? What is the best way to ensure that corporate resources are wiped from a personal device that should no longer have access to them?

Solution

Microsoft Digital has been involved in mobile device management (MDM) for several years and is evolving strategies and best practices to ensure the proper balance between convenience and security as BYOD becomes the norm in organizations of all sizes.

Microsoft Digital approaches MDM a bit differently today than it did in the past. Even as recently as 2013, the focus was much more on providing access to applications. Now, however, the focus is on access as defined by certificate and profile provisioning. In the future, the focus will be on conditional access that is based on the state of the device as interpreted through the MDM system and Microsoft Azure Active Directory.

The Microsoft Intune and Microsoft Azure teams are working together to provide solutions so that Microsoft Digital can address a range of related issues: identity and access management, mobile device and app management, and information protection. The first step is to make Microsoft Digital cloud-based and enable a mobile workforce.

Identity and access management

For employees who use multiple devices for work, a key convenience—a requirement, even—is to have single sign-on (SSO) and a common identity, so that they can get their work done on whatever device suits them at the moment. A common identity enables application access management, regardless of whether those applications are on the device or in the cloud. This ensures that the user can have a consistent experience across devices and remain as productive as possible.

Microsoft Digital is delivering identity and access management by providing that SSO experience, using federation to manage access to external resources, and consistently managing identities across on-premises and cloud-based identity domains. This helps Microsoft Digital address the matter of managing access.

Developers can build applications that use the common identity model, integrating applications either with Active Directory Domain Services for on-premises applications or with Azure for cloud-based applications.

Azure Active Directory syncs with on-premises Active Directory Domain Services through Azure AD Connect. Azure Active Directory enables self-service password changes and resets, and self-service group management for internal users. It also supports multifactor authentication, so that internal users don’t have to carry around their smart cards.

Multifactor authentication provides an additional layer of security in case a device falls into the wrong hands or is used improperly. When a user attempts to log on or perform an action that is subject to multifactor authentication, the application or service confirms the user’s identity by sending a text, making a phone call, or using a mobile app. Typically, this additional authentication factor is a numeric code, such as a personal identification number (PIN), and may only be intended for a single use. The user must respond (usually within a limited period, such as 10 minutes) before the application or service allows him or her to proceed.

Credential caching enables enterprises to determine how long credentials can be cached on a device. This allows the enterprises to customize the user experience when users access applications and resources on devices. For example, enterprises can specify how long credentials pass through during logon or device registration, so that users do not have to enter their credentials so many times.

Mobile device management

Users prefer a consistent experience when they access and work with their line-of-business (LOB) apps, no matter what device they use, how often they use it, and what platform it runs. Device enrollment should be simple, and the process for finding and working with apps and other internal resources should be familiar. In addition, policies should help users feel secure that their personal data is protected on devices that they also use for work, and it should be possible to remove devices that users no longer want included in a managed environment.

Device enrollment

Users can enroll a device relatively quickly in Intune. Notably, the process is opt-in rather than opt-out. This sets a friendlier tone for the experience, because it doesn’t feel like a mandate. Users recognize the value of being able to use personal devices for work, and voluntarily enroll them.

Similarly, when users no longer want to use a device for work, they can easily remove it by using the Intune console (the web portal for information workers). For example, if a device has been lost or stolen, the user can either remove it for himself or herself, or request that Microsoft Digital do so. When a device is removed, corporate assets are automatically removed from it. Devices can be completely wiped or just selectively wiped. See the “Device retirement/wiping” section later in this document.

Expand your Galaxy

Smartphones

Upper half of Galaxy S22 Ultra in Burgundy and Galaxy S22 in Phantom White, both seen from the rear. They are both balancing on one corner. Upper half of Galaxy S22 Ultra in Burgundy and Galaxy S22 in Phantom White, both seen from the rear. They are both balancing on one corner.

Galaxy S22 Ultra

Galaxy S22 | S22 +

Galaxy A53 5G

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Tablets

Three Galaxy Tab S8 Series are shown from the front, tilted to the back. The back two have their rear sides facing forward and are overlayed by the front one, which has its display showing a close up of Saturn and its rings. A S Pen is also leaning onto the display at an angle. Three Galaxy Tab S8 Series are shown from the front, tilted to the back. The back two have their rear sides facing forward and are overlayed by the front one, which has its display showing a close up of Saturn and its rings. A S Pen is also leaning onto the display at an angle.

Galaxy Tab S8 | S8+ | S8 Ultra

Galaxy Tab A7 Lite (Wi-fi)

Galaxy Tab A7 (Wi-fi)

2-in-1 Book Cover Keyboard

Galaxy Book

A burgundy-coloured Galaxy Book2 Pro 360 is almost folded all the way back and there is a wallpaper with pink waves on the screen. An S Pen is touching the screen. To the right are two Galaxy Book devices, one black and one white. A burgundy-coloured Galaxy Book2 Pro 360 is almost folded all the way back and there is a wallpaper with pink waves on the screen. An S Pen is touching the screen. To the right are two Galaxy Book devices, one black and one white.

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Part 3: Some Other Things That You Can Do With Apple Mobile Device USB Driver Download

Get Your Apple Mobile Device Service Restarted

If in any case that your iTunes program still does not recognize your iOS device after you were able to download and as well as install the Apple Mobile Device USB Driver on your computer, then here is another option that you can try. And that is by restarting your Apple Mobile Device USB Driver. And with that, here is what you will be needing to do.

Step 3: Next is choose Properties. This can be found under the General tab. From there, go ahead and have the Startup set to Automatic. Then click on the Stop button for you to stop your Apple Mobile Device Service.

Bonus Tip: If You Are Not Able To See Your Apple USB Driver from the Device Manager

If in case that you can see your Apple Mobile Device USB Driver from your Device Manager but you are not able to see your iOS device USB driver from the list, then you can go ahead and try to fix it by doing an update on your Apple driver.

Step 3: If you were not able to find it, then you have to go to the Universal Serial Bus Controllers and then choose Apple Mobile Device USB Driver. And then right-click on it and then choose Update Driver then go to Browse my computer so that the driver software can be located and then select this folder:

After doing all of the steps above, your Apple USB driver will then be updated on your computer. After that, you can now have your iOS device unplug your iOS device from PC and have it plugin again to your PC. Once you do, check if your iOS device can now be detected by your computer.
Apple Mobile Device Service and Apple Mobile Device Support Reinstallation

Some iOS users are having trouble connecting their device to their computer. This is because Apple Driver or the Apple Mobile Device Service is not available or it is not installed properly. And because of this kind of situation, what they want to do is to have the Apple Mobile Device Support and the Apple Mobile Device Service should be installed separately.

Well, the fact is that, the Apple Mobile Device Support or the Apple Mobile Device Service is known to be one of the components of the iTunes program and that they cannot be separately installed. So for you to be able to have the Apple Mobile Device Service reinstalled on your computer, go ahead and take out iTunes and its component that is related to it and then have your iTunes reinstalled from Apple Store or the Microsoft Store.

Part 4: Conclusion

And as you can see, doing the Apple Mobile device USB Driver download is a very important thing to do since your iOS device is not able to recognize by your computer and your iTunes program as well. If you do not have the driver for your Apple device, then you will not be able to transfer any of your data from your iPhone, iPad, or iPod device.

So with that, if your Apple Driver is missing, all you need to do is to follow the methods that we have shown you above. That way, you will be able to have your iOS device be detected by your iTunes program and as well as your computer. You can choose from the methods above as to which is the one that applies to your situation. We assure you that at the end of the solutions above, you will be able to fix the issue that you are having with your computer.

Resources:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/insidetrack/mobile-device-management-at-microsoft
https://www.samsung.com/uk/mobile/
https://www.fonedog.com/tricks/apple-mobile-device-usb-driver-download.html

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